News of Folkestone Artworks

Published on May 17th, 2019

With the 2020 Folkestone Triennial exhibition at an advanced planning stage, more artworks have been added to the permanent collection, “Folkestone Artworks”.

Folkestone Artworks is a collection of pieces originally commissioned for the Triennial and has grown to become one of the world’s largest urban outdoor art exhibitions in an urban setting. The collection is free to access and, for the most part, can be viewed  24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

The collection now comprises 46 permanent artworks, including pieces from each of the Folkestone Triennials that have taken place since 2008. These exhibitions have brought hundreds of thousands of people to Folkestone to see work by internationally renowned artists, including Turner Prize winners, and have provided a showcase for emerging artists and those from the local community. Lubaina Himid’s evocative “Jelly Mould Pavilion” has become a new landmark as people walk along the Boardwalk and is one of the pieces added recently, as is Bill Woodrow’s “The Ledge”, depicting figures of an Inuit and a seal and exploring environmental issues with implications of climate change.

With  a handful of exceptions, the works can be found at the original sites that the artists had in mind, Patrick Tuttofuoco’s  “Folkestone” (2018) being a notable exception having necessarily been relocated during the restoration of Folkestone Harbour.

Triennial exhibitions and Folkestone Artworks have attracted widespread press, radio and television coverage, perhaps most notably in 2014 when Michael Sailstorfer buried gold nuggets on Sunny Sands beach. The Roger De Haan Charitable Trust has been a major supporter of Folkestone Triennial since its inception, and continues to provide generous funding both for the exhibition itself and to enable the maintenance and curation of the Folkestone Artworks collection.

Click on “play” below for a video introduction to Folkestone Artworks, courtesy of Creative Folkestone.